20 Things You Don’t Know About TITANIC

 TITANIC

Titanic is a 1997 American epic romantic disaster film directed, written, co-produced, co-edited and partly financed by James Cameron. A fictionalized account of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, it stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet as members of different social classes who fall in love aboard the ship during its ill-fated maiden voyage.

Cameron’s inspiration for the film was predicated on his fascination with shipwrecks; he wanted to convey the emotional message of the tragedy and felt that a love story interspersed with the human loss would be essential to achieving this. Production on the film began in 1995, when Cameron shot footage of the actual Titanic wreck. The modern scenes were shot on board the Akademik Mstislav Keldysh, which Cameron had used as a base when filming the wreck. A reconstruction of the Titanic built at Playas de Rosarito in Baja California, scale models, and computer-generated imagery were used to recreate the sinking. The film was partially funded by Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox, and, at the time, was the most expensive film ever made, with an estimated budget of $200 million.

Titanic was one of classic movies, Which was talk of town when it’s first released but most people don’t know things attached to the movie and on this article we will tell you just that.

  1. When Jack is preparing to draw Rose, he says to her, “Lie on that bed, uh, I mean couch.” The line was scripted “Lie on that couch”, but Leonardo DiCaprio made an honest mistake and James Cameron liked it so much he kept it in.
  2. The scenes set in 1912, i.e. the whole movie except the present-day scenes and the opening and ending credits, have a total length of two hours and forty minutes, the exact time it took for Titanic to sink. Besides, exactly 37 seconds pass in the movie between the lookouts warning and the actual collision with the iceberg – the same amount of time it took in real life.
  3. Reportedly, James Cameron spoke to and personally provided each of the extras (at least 150 of them) with names and back stories of Titanic passengers.
  4. The hands seen sketching Rose are not Leonardo DiCaprio’s, but director James Cameron’s. In post-production, Cameron, who is left-handed, mirror-imaged the sketching shots so the artist would be appear to be right-handed, like DiCaprio.
  5. The studios wanted Matthew McConaughey, but James Cameron insisted on Leonardo DiCaprio.
  6. When James Cameron was writing the movie, he intended for the main characters Rose DeWitt Bukater and Jack Dawson to be entirely fictitious. It was only after the script was finished that he discovered that there had been a real “J. Dawson” who died aboard the Titanic. This “J. Dawson” was trimmer Joseph Dawson, who had been born September 1888 in Dublin, Ireland. His body was salvaged and buried at Fairview Lawn cemetery in Nova Scotia with many other Titanic victims. Today, his grave stone (#227) is the most widely visited in the cemetery.
  7. Many of the “core extras” used for the movie took on characteristics of actual survivors. One scene where two little girls are loaded onto a lifeboat and the man says, “It’s only for a little while” is based on testimony from one of the girls who survived.
  8. In the scene where the water comes crashing into the Grand Staircase room, the film makers only had one shot at it because the entire set and furnishings were going to be destroyed in the shot.
  9. Paramount had to send out replacement reels to theaters who had literally worn out their copies.
  10. At $200 million, the movie cost more than the Titanic itself. The cost to construct the ship in 1910-1912 was £1.5 million, equivalent to $7.5 million at the time and about $120 to $150 million in 1997 dollars.
  11. James Cameron, being a certified scuba diver, has admitted that the reason why he wanted to make a movie about “a big ship that sinks” was because he just wanted to dive to the real wreck of the Titanic.
  12. The bedtime story the Irish mother tells her children is the story of “The Children of Lir,” an old Irish folktale about children turned into swans. That is, unless it’s actually the story of “Tir na nOg, Land of eternal youth and beauty”, an Irish folktale where no one ages.
  13. The character of Rose is partially based on California artist Beatrice Wood, who died in 1998 at the age of 105.
  14. Most of the decor on the ship was either reconstructed by or under the supervision of researchers of the White Star Line, the original company which constructed and furnished the Titanic.
  15. Lindsay Lohan auditioned for the role of Cora Cartmell. Lohan, who was then an unknown and was only 8 years old at the time casting took place, was the top choice for the role. However, James Cameron felt that Lohan’s fiery red hair would confuse people into thinking she was related to the characters Rose and Ruth, who both had fiery red hair.Alexandrea Owens was cast instead.
  16. Nicole Kidman, Madonna, Jodie Foster, Cameron Diaz and Sharon Stone were all considered for the role of Rose.
  17. Macaulay Culkin was considered for the role of Jack Dawson.
  18. To sink the Grand Staircase into the purpose-built 5 million gallon tank, 90,000 gallons of water were dumped through it as it was lowered into the tank. Such was the volume that the staircase was ripped from its steel-reinforced foundations.
  19. The completed film ignores the freighter Californian, which had stopped for the night due to the ice hazard and was within sight of the Titanic throughout the sinking (the Californian’s warning had been received and sent to the bridge but was not placed in the chartroom). An early version of the script included a scene on the Californian, but James Cameron cut out the subplot after filming it to shorten running time. The two actors in the scene on the Californian were Adam Barker as radio operator Cyril Evans and Peter John White as Third Officer Groves.
  20. Steven Spielberg was so impressed with the film’s 3D conversion, that he hired the same retrofitting company to do the same for Jurassic Park’s 3D conversion.

Thanks to IMDB for the facts.