3 Amazing Movies You Probably Never Saw

THE FUTURE

THE FUTURE

Writer-director and star Miranda July’s latest may seem an arty conceit to some, playing fast and loose with an alternative narrative structure. Or it may seem like a magical fancy, sending you out of the theater in a state of enchanted rumination. Responses to “The Future” have been divided, and at both screenings, I’ve attended people have walked out — a high recommendation in my book.

Since she made You and Me and Everyone We Knew in 2005, I’ve bought into July’s uniquely whimsical, what-the-hell, go-for-it sense about life. Here, narration by a sick cat, the magical realism notion of stopping time, and the dramedy dialogue of a thirtysomething couple facing their future as the uncaring world spins on, make for an insightful portrayal of how we deal with every day while contemplating the future. As director, July specifically highlights her movement, performance-art acting to shape her character as one we relate to and have feelings for while creating a visual style that can only be called refreshing.

MARGIN CALL

MARGIN CALL

It’s nothing short of amazing that neophyte writer-director J.C. Chandor made an entertaining, insightful movie about greedy, condescending money manipulators, those titans of finance responsible for the 2008 financial crisis. It’s a behind-the-scenes drama about the infamous Lehman Bros. crash when the upper 1% pitilessly dumped ruin on the 99% of the rest of us.

Set in a high-tower Manhattan office and filmed with relentless simplicity –people move about and talk in offices and conference rooms – Chandor extracts some partial sympathy for these men as they first panic, then plan, then desperately struggle to save themselves by ruthlessly screwing the little guy in the process. Chandler’s serves his top notch, character-driven screenplay (Academy Award-nominated) superbly as director, working up the edge-of-your-seat tension even as the cast is hunched over computers spouting business jargon. The

ensemble acting, all-around intelligent and impressive, includes Stanley Tucci, Jeremy Irons, and stand-out Kevin Spacey, a man as heartless about his co-workers as he is heartfelt about his dog.

This film has achieved over 90% of the positive recommendation from critics and was written down in the top thriller movies list. Between that, if you have any problems with writing assignments, feel free to ask EssayLab to receive high-quality help.

THE MYTH OF THE AMERICAN SLEEPOVER

THE MYTH OF THE AMERICAN SLEEPOVER

This terrific movie, about a group of suburban adolescents yearning, searching, struggling with their growing bodies and each other as they come of age on the last day of summer, smacks of Dazed and Confused mixed with American Graffiti. Only better, much better.

Writer-director David Robert Mitchell captures the angst and vulnerability of how today’s adolescents talk, act and relate.  This is the real stuff, what we don’t see in teen movies;  where actors play their ages and don’t hide the acne, baby fat, and braces — no well-toned 30-year-old models pretending to be seventeen like we see in Hollywood movies.

“Myth” is a first time, independent, low-budget feature that bowled them over on the festival circuit last year and ended up in limited distribution. A shame Mitchell didn’t get a better deal. As these characters roam from one sleepover party to another, and the hormonal rush turns to awkward groping, Mitchell builds a sense of compassion as they muddle through. We’ve all been there. It’s funny, bemusing, and insightful, reflecting honestly on this rite of passage.