5 Best Basketball Movies Of All Time

The nail-biting drama screened in the sports movies have made them a fan favorite. And if you can add a pinch of an underdog narrative in the plot, the movie is bound to find success in the box office. Today we are going to talk about five such basketball movies which scored a golden goal in our heart.

Teen Wolf 

Teen Wolf

This famous 80s film starring Michael J. Fox features him as a high school kid who tries to gain attention and popularity by using his differences. You are bound to admire his skills and feel envious even as he transforms into a werewolf and starts dribbling the basketball in the front of some stupefied fans and stunned teammates. He eventually takes advantage by finishing with a slam dunk as he sprints down the court with his immense power. Although the logic behind this movie is preposterous, it merges basketball and fantasy in an extremely funny manner.

Glory Road

Glory Road

The story revolves around the very first all-black line-up in the history of college basketball. Josh Lucas dons the cap of coach Don Haskins who had actually led UTEP during the 1965-66 season to a national championship. The film beautifully portrays how Haskins molds a group of young stars based on their skills and not skin color by taking them to the numero uno spot.

SPACE JAM

Space Jam

This movie served as the ideal star vehicle for Michael Jordan apart from creating an earworm hit song. By mixing animation with some of the biggest names of NBA, this movie takes us through a fun-filled roller coaster. Jordan teams up with Looney Tunes for taking on a game of basketball against some supercharged aliens who have taken this fellow NBA teammates’ skills hostage. But the monsters realize pretty soon that it was a complete mistake on their part to challenge the greatest player of all time especially when he had the support of Bill Murray who carried out his demon defeating agenda like an absolute boss. This 90’s movie privileged fun over fact as the cartoon legends and monsters targeted to score at the adjustable basketball hoops in the epic final game.

Coach Carter

Celebrated actor Samuel L. Jackson takes on the center stage as a dictatorial head coach who shoulders the responsibility of boosting up an unmotivated team by bringing a paradigm change in its culture with some well-intentioned and strict rules as well as caustic temperament. This movie is based on the real-life story of Ken Carter who had locked out the Richmond High School team in 1999 from participating in sports unless their grades improved. In a similar fashion, the movie deals with the tension of merging expectations with academic integrity and discipline. Jackson’s role as a leader of a rag-tag group of players focuses solely on the coach’s responsibility in teaching them that discipline should never be sacrificed for a few wins.

White Men Can't Jump 

White Men Can’t Jump

In spite of standing well below six feet, both Woody Harrelson and Wesley Snipes portrayed the spirit of real basketball with their trash-talking bravura and undying confidence which more than made up for their height disparity. Although the Venice Beach hustler duo started out as foes, they realized pretty soon that a large potential exists for making money out of “chumps” which was the most insulting street ball diss stereotyping on the basis of skin color. Ron Shelton, the movie director took the basketball scenes to a whole new level whether they were filmed at the playground or on the beach coupled with immense comic dexterity. Each of the games portrayed was extremely entertaining and some will even have you biting your fingernails in a way similar to the NBA finals.

Hollywood understands very well that storytelling in the penultimate recipe of striking gold as a blockbuster hit. These inspirational stories of athletes making their mark felt, understanding the true meaning of team spirit and winning against all odds is bound to serve as catnip for screenwriters, actors, and directors for years to come.