Banksy Opens A Dystopian Homeware Store But No One Can Get In, Due To a Trademark Dispute

Banksy

Banksy just revealed his latest creation, however, the artist said that the motive behind the project was “possibly the least poetic reason to ever make some art.” A trademark dispute. The popular street artist had been pushed into taking the unusual step of opening his own homeware store in London following a legal dispute with a greeting card company.

More info: banksy.co.uk | Instagram

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

The shop, named Gross Domestic Product, appeared in the Croydon area, on Church Street. The temp installation will be on view for two weeks, featuring many window displays. And even though it will be locked for passers-by, some of the things will be sold on GDP’s associated online store including welcome mats (which Banksy hired refugees in Greek detainment camps to stitch, giving them back all the proceeds). Revenue made by the doll sets will also support the acquisition of a replacement boat for activist Pia Klemp. Klemp’s own boat was confiscated by the Italian govt after she was accused of aiding illegal immigration when rescuing people from drowning in the Mediterranean.

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

Tying Gross Domestic Product to his larger body of work, Banksy included motifs his fans should already be accustomed with. The fireplace and stenciled jacquard wallpaper, for example, are from his Walled Off Hotel, and the iconic stab-proof Union Jack vest is what he created for Stormzy to wear at the Glastonbury Festival.

 

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

Image credits: Ash Versus

Image credits: Ash Versus

“A greeting card company is contesting the trademark I hold to my art,” the artist said in a statement. “And attempting to take custody of my name so they can sell their fake Banksy merchandise legally.”

The anonymous celebrity of the art world thought the card company was “banking on the idea” he would not show up in court to defend himself.

Mark Stephens, an arts lawyer and founder of the Design and Artists Copyright Society, is the one who’s giving Banksy legal advice in this tricky situation. “Banksy is in a difficult position,” he said. “Because he doesn’t produce his own range of shoddy merchandise and the law is quite clear – if the trademark holder is not using the mark, then it can be transferred to someone who will.”

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

 

Image credits: Ash Versus

“Sometimes you go to work and it’s hard to know what to paint, but for the past few months I’ve been making stuff for the sole purpose of fulfilling trademark categories under EU law,” the artist added, admitting the subject matter is “not a very sexy muse”.

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

Image credits: Ash Versus

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

 

Image credits: mhollander38

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

Image credits: mhollander38

Image credits: mhollander38

Image credits: mhollander38

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

Image credits: GrossDomesticProduct

Loading...

Your Comments / What Do You Think ?

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.